Word Of The Moment #2

not schadenfreude
The Queen’s English Word for Schadenfreude is…

My favourite word at the moment is:


EPICARICACY

Pronunciation

/ˌɛpɪˈkærɪkəsi/

Epicaricacy

  1. (rare) Rejoicing at or deriving pleasure from the misfortunes of others.

Synonyms

Etymology

Usage notes

  • The word is mentioned in some early dictionaries, but there is little or no evidence of actual usage until it was picked up by various “interesting word” websites around the turn of the twenty-first century.

 

A new-found word, thanks to the good folk at Crikey (the only news service I pay good money for), from whom I learned recently that the commonly-held ‘fact’ (i.e., a factoid), that ‘schadenfreude‘ has no English-language equivalent, is actually a myth.

Schadenfreude gained some popularity in recent years, thanks mostly to quasi-intellectuals and people who thought they were somehow justified in their almost-constant feelings of epicaricacy towards the rest of us because they ‘knew’ a foreign word for which there was no English-language equivalent.

Well, screw you!, quasi’s.

There is a word, and always was a word, for your smugness in the face of victory at the expense of everyone else – AND YOU NEVER KNEW IT!

Now you do, and I hope you enjoy it.

I too hope to revel in some epicaricacy at some point in the future.

Aah, yes, my epicaricacy will come…

AsGrayAsGray

* – Definition, synonyms, etymology, and usage notes sourced from Wiktionary.

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17 thoughts on “Word Of The Moment #2

      1. Ha! Moist…
        Such a divisive word; it really makes some people squirm, and others love the sound of it. Personally, I love the sound of moist while said moistness is squirming.
        But that’s just me… Maybe I shouldn’t have said anything at all.
        Can I edit or delete my own comments on my own web-log?

        Liked by 1 person

  1. Moist and squirming eh? What have I signed up for here?!

    Moist is an evocative word. Haberdashery is pretty groovy too.

    Moist haberdashery would lead to chaffing though, and I am not a fan of chaffing.

    – sonmicloud

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haberdashery is a fantastic word, but it’s not onomatopoetic enough. Mens accessory stores should be called… mens accessory stores. That’s the way they work. They shouldn’t get good words like haberdashery to describe their stuff.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. A haberdashery shop isn’t a men’s accessory store in my land, it is a place full of ribbons and wool, and material, and buttons and all manner of wonderful bits and pieces for the arts of knitting and sewing and the like. So I think it works quite well, however I appreciate it is different in your land.
        I hear the men in the stores speak very highly of you too mind *laughs a lot* .

        – sonmicloud.

        Liked by 1 person

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